May 25, 2022

Today in Apple history: Apple offers ice water to Windows users in hell

iTunes on PCs
Released solely on Macs previously in the year, the iTunes Music Store offered tunes for 99 cents per track. Deals with all five major record labels, along with more than 200 indie labels, made numerous thousands of songs offered.

October 16, 2003: Six months after opening the iTunes Music Store for Mac owners, Apple broadens the service to cover Windows PCs.
Apple CEO Steve Jobs later quips that making iTunes readily available to Windows owners is similar to “offering a glass of ice water to somebody in hell.”

” The iTunes Music Store has changed the way individuals legally purchase music online, and now its readily available to 10s of millions more music enthusiasts with iTunes for Windows,” stated Jobs in a press release at the time. “While our competitors have not even come close to matching our first generation, were currently releasing the second generation of the iTunes Music Store for Mac and Windows.”

Nevertheless, like opening iOS to developers five years later on, Jobs choice to port iTunes to Windows did not come overnight. In some methods, its simple to see what sustained his uneasiness.
During the bad old days of the 1990s, Apple slowly let its special selling points get diluted. Windows piled on functions, polished its rough edges and dominated the personal computing market.

By this point, Apple had sold more than 13 million songs. iTunes made legal downloads a genuine alternative for a music market battling with piracy due to the rise of peer-to-peer file-sharing networks like Napster. iTunes likewise provided users powerful tools to manage the material they acquired.
A tough call for Steve Jobs
Making the software available to Windows PC owners made sure the continued development of the iTunes Music Store.

iTunes and iPod: A powerful combo
Now Apple had, in iTunes and the extremely popular iPod– the music player it launched in 2001 that famously “put 1,000 tunes in your pocket”– a combination of software application and hardware that might coax brand-new users into the Apple community. Allowing either item to work with Windows appeared like offering up an advantage.
Jobs correctly explained that both iTunes and the iPod assisted drive Mac sales. His lieutenants at the time– Phil Schiller, Jon Rubinstein, Jeff Robbin and Tony Fadell– observed that, while this was real, Apple was no longer simply about Macs. At one point, Jobs stated letting iTunes and the iPod work on PC would take place “over my dead body.”

In the end, Jobs saw business sense in the choice and pulled back. But only after he ran the numbers. Jobs properly saw that declining Mac sales could never outweigh the gain from increased iPod sales.
iTunes: The finest Windows app ever composed
Prior to iTunes for Windows, PC users had to run software made by a company called MusicMatch to utilize their iPods. However, Jobs firmly insisted that if Apple was going to let its gorgeous hardware work on PCs, it should manage as much of the experience as possible. That indicated Apple needed to port iTunes to Windows.
This wasnt almost writing a brand-new app. Apple also needed to renegotiate with music labels to get them to accompany it. Once they struck offers, Apple began working on iTunes for Windows.

iTunes for Windows: A killer keynote

During the software applications unveiling in a Macworld keynote on October 16, 2003, Jobs referred to it– with particular interest– as “the very best Windows app ever composed.”
You can see Jobs iTunes for Windows keynote listed below. It offers an excellent appearance at his discussion style. Plus, it serves as a great reminder of how Apple helped the music market shift into the digital period.

You can watch Jobs iTunes for Windows keynote listed below.

At one point, Jobs said letting iTunes and the iPod run on PC would take place “over my dead body.”

Prior to iTunes for Windows, PC users had to run software made by a company called MusicMatch to utilize their iPods. That suggested Apple needed to port iTunes to Windows.
Once they struck deals, Apple started working on iTunes for Windows.

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